Amended Harris Dress Motion

15 March 2017

The Amended Haris Dress Motion

Firstly I refer you to the original Haris Dress Motion. You will notice that in the original version of the Haris Dress Motion, the prescriptions for men and women are starkly different. Whereas for men the Dress Code is detailed to the utmost degree, for women it merely read “Please look pretty.” Whilst Haris was no doubt trying to be humorous in the 1920s spirit in which the dress code is written, and did not knowingly intend to offend anyone, the point was well made at the 2016 KCLMC AGM that this strongly gender-distinguishing aspect of Haris Dress is no longer welcome. A motion was passed to amend Haris Dress accordingly. The amended form of the dress code is below.

For those unacquainted with Haris Dress, let it be known that in my experience, at least, the stricter elements of Haris Dress are made in jest. What is required is that you make a strong effort to be smart, extravagant or dazzling. Follow Haris Dress as far as you can - and woe betide those who attempt to attend the AGM in jeans.

Daniel Ayers

KCLMC President 2016-17

Appendix 1

The word of the day is debonair.

Upon the shoulders: A blazer is the minimum requirement. Tweed is highly recommended: light enough to be pressed into adequate creases, but coarse enough to the touch. Appropriate patterns and colours are blue windowpane check on mustard brown, rust brown overcheck on dark brown, RAF blue herringbone or pale ginger houndstooth on beige.

You may look to Edward VII, Robert Donat, Gilbert & Sullivan, Alfonso XIII of Spain and Dylan Thomas for inspiration.

It is unnecessary to remind you that Harris tweed is the only acceptable demarcation (as protected under the Harris Tweed Act, 1993: “a pure virgin wool fabric spun, dyed and finished in the Outer Hebrides and hand-woven on the islands of Lewis, Harris, Uist or Barra”).

Remember to look for the key signs of your tweed’s heritage, namely a bespoke tailor’s details on the inside of the inner pocket, urine stains and a few well placed moth holes.

A note upon faux tweeds: these are easily distinguished by their (usually) Prince of Wales check having been superimposed upon a plain woollen fabric. These are NOT acceptable.

Under the jacket: Plain, pastel or subtly checked shirts, preferably in flannel. Short sleeves are not permitted.

Upon the throat: Bright cravat or repeat-pattern tie - woollen or knitted ties often blend more harmoniously with a well chosen tweed. Remember a matching silk handkerchief for the jacket breast pocket. Bow ties may be worn by request.

Upon the legs: Tweed trousers are recommended. Moleskin trousers or corduroy are acceptable (avoid lurid colours such as cherry red, mustard and electric blue if possible).

Under NO circumstances are jeans permitted. You shall be made to remove them.

Upon the head: A flat or eight-sectioned cap is recommended, or a trilby for a more transatlantic look. Under no circumstances should your cranial adornment be displaying a check pattern.

Upon the feet: Full brogues or a pair of matt-polished Oxfords are required (no half-brogues). All shoes must have laces and a weight no less than 1/3 pound. These should be complemented with a pair of Argyle socks.

Accessories: All watches shall be removed and be replaced with hunter pocket watches. A carriage clock may be carried with prior written notification. A walking cane may be utilised (no crook handles please).

You are reminded to pay attention to four golden rules of fashion:

NEVER mix the parts of different suits

NEVER cross your tweeds

NEVER wear a blazer with jeans

NEVER wear jeans.

Please be aware that those of you not complying with the here-prescribed code shall not be allowed to attend the AGM. The Waterfront Bar is an esteemed and exclusive venue and those who choose not to dress appropriately may be refused entry at the door. KCLMC does not hold itself responsible for those who are refused entry upon sartorial grounds.

Harris Dress Motion

28 April 2010

I propose to you, the members of King’s College London Mountaineering Club (hereafter referred to as “the Club”) here present: Firstly, that the dress code written by the late Mr. Haris Ahmed BMedSci – for the occasion of the 2008 annual general meeting of King’s College London Mountaineering Club (hereafter referred to as “the Dress Code” and reproduced in Appendix 1 below) – should become the official dress of the Club.

Secondly, that the Dress Code shall be known, within the Club, as “Haris Dress” in due deference to its creator.

Thirdly, that the Dress Code shall be the attire prescribed for formal occasions of the Club including, but not limited to, annual general meetings and extraordinary general meetings.

Fourthly, that wearing of the Dress Code to ordinary committee meetings of the Club should be encouraged, but not made compulsory.

Finally, that when the Dress Code is prescribed for an event, any Club member in attendance not adhering adequately to the Dress Code (in the opinion of the Chair of the meeting or senior Club official present), shall be made to realise the error of their ways. This shall be achieved by the administration of a suitable challenge, as decided upon by the Club official previously mentioned or by the mass of club members present.

Andrew Feneley

London

Appendix 1

For the Gentlemen:

The word of the day is debonair.

Upon the shoulders: A blazer is the minimum requirement. Tweed is highly recommended: light enough to be pressed into adequate creases, but coarse enough to the touch.Appropriate patterns and colours are blue windowpane check on mustard brown, rust brown overcheck on dark brown, RAF blue herringbone or pale ginger houndstooth on beige.

Gentlemen may look to Edward VII, Robert Donat, Gilbert & Sullivan, Alfonso XIII of Spain and Dylan Thomas for inspiration.

It is unnecessary to remind you that Harris tweed is the only acceptable demarcation (as protected under the Harris Tweed Act, 1993: “a pure virgin wool fabric spun, dyed and finished in the Outer Hebrides and hand­woven on the islands of Lewis, Harris, Uist or Barra”).

Remember to look for the key signs of your tweed’s heritage, namely a bespoke tailor’s details on the inside of the inner pocket, urine stains and a few well placed moth holes.

A note upon faux tweeds: these are easily distinguished by their (usually) Prince of Wales check having been superimposed upon a plain woollen fabric. These are NOT acceptable.

Under the jacket: Plain, pastel or subtly checked shirts, preferably in flannel. Short sleeves are not permitted.

Upon the throat: Bright cravat or repeat­ pattern tie­ woollen or knitted ties often blend more harmoniously with a well chosen tweed. Remember a matching silk handkerchief for the jacket breast pocket. Bow ties may be worn by request.

Upon the legs: Tweed trousers are recommended. Moleskin trousers or corduroy are acceptable (avoid lurid colours such as cherry red, mustard and electric blue if possible).

Under NO circumstances are jeans permitted. You shall be made to remove them.

Upon the head: A flat or eight ­sectioned cap is recommended, or a trilby for a more transatlantic look. Under no circumstances should your cranial adornment be displaying a check pattern.

Upon the feet: Full brogues or a pair of matt­polished Oxfords are required (no half­brogues). All shoes must have laces and a weight no less than 1/3 pound. These should be complemented with a pair of Argyle socks.

Accessories: All watches shall be removed and be replaced with hunter pocket watches. A carriage clock may be carried with prior written notification. A walking cane may be utilised (no crook handles please).

Gentlemen are reminded to pay attention to four golden rules of fashion:

NEVER mix the parts of different suits NEVER cross your tweeds NEVER wear a blazer with jeans NEVER wear jeans.

Please be aware that those gentlemen not complying with the here­prescribed code shall not be allowed to attend the AGM. The Waterfront Bar is an esteemed and exclusive venue and those who choose not to dress appropriately may be refused entry at the door. KCLMC does not hold itself responsible for those who are refused entry upon sartorial grounds.

For the ladies:

Please look pretty.

The Much Honoured Muhammed

27 August 2009

The Much Honoured Muhammed ‘Haris’ Ahmed, Laird of Kincavel tragically died whilst cycling to Guys campus on Tuesday 9th March. Haris was a well‐loved, active and respected member of the GKT and KCL community for over three and a half years. When Haris came to Kings in September 2006 he immediately took to student life and was known as something of a party animal. Haris took it upon himself to ensure everyone got as merry as he was, often investing sizeable amounts of cash on mass rounds of shots. However he always took care of us if we were a bit worse for wear, as such we took care of him too. In his first year Haris was very active during RAG week, winning the accolade ‘Raggiest Fresher,’ for which he received a giant fluffy pink elephant. Haris also joined Kings College London Mountaineering Club, a club he dedicated a substantial amount of his energy to as a committee member and enthusiastic climber. Within the club he was known for organising raucous socials which ended in people knocking out teeth, waking up in homeless shelters and getting taxis to the wrong parts of London. Haris always came on club trips in the UK and Europe. Last summer he climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. KCLMC will not be the same without one of its most beloved members.

Academically Haris showed great talent, displaying a sizeable knowledge of medicine but also history, current affairs and literature. His dedication to work seemed boundless, in a second year History of Medicine essay he referred back to original Ancient Greek transcripts. Despite missing many first year lectures through self‐inflicted ‘illness’ he still passed with a high grade. This year he was working towards a BSc in Psychology. Haris was destined to become a great doctor.

Haris was known for his eccentricities. These were numerous but a few will be summarised here. Haris established a KCL Mining Society convincing Freshers that they owned their own mine in Wales. In second year he devised the Baltic Quay rules, a lengthy cross referenced document which laid out the laws any guest in his flat should abide by. These included if, at any time, Pimp My Ride UK is on it must be viewed, in it’s entirety, with appropriate satisfaction gained from said viewing. Persons of the female persuasion are forbidden from playing Pro Evolution Soccer or making direct visual contact with the Playstation 2 or any match in progress without the express consent, written or verbal, but not implied, of a Chair of the Council. All persons reserve the right to request the Council’s permission for a tactical exportation, which must be performed in the bathroom. Regulations ranged from alcohol, gentlemanly conduct and the Bible aka a Tesco Direct Catalogue. Haris loved the game Poleconomy, the game of the politics and economy of Canada, for those of you (un)fortunate not to have played, and once played it for over 6 hours designing an accompanying excel spreadsheet. Indeed Haris was a great inventor of games. His favourites included Oven Ball, a variation of petanque in which balls were thrown into a stone oven built by the man himself. He also was instrumental in the creation of Penalty Golf, a complex game of golf where opponents could use distraction tactics including the ‘Woodsman’ where a tree branch was waved in your face or ‘Tent Face’ where a small tent was put over the players head. Haris loved the North African card game Beseq, which he often used this to make decisions with his girlfriend Claire.

Haris was the quintessential English gentleman, a fan of cricket, golf and croquet, member of the East India Club and of course a Laird, a title acquired for him by his flat‐mate Kaanthan Jawahar Esq. Frequently Hairs could be seen wearing a tweed jacket, sporting his personalised umbrella with cover or eating at his favourite oyster bar (where he would often take girls on a first date). However, Haris was a also obsessed with ‘G’ culture; anything ghetto or gangsta. On a KCLMC trip to the Alps he learnt all the words to So Solid Crew’s ‘21 Seconds,’ and was a fan of Mr Rascal.

Joking aside, Haris touched many people’s lives. Having been around his closest friends and his family at the time after his passing it is clear how much this tragic event has affected the many who knew him. No one seemed to have argued in any serious way with him, my last argument with him was about what constitutes a pie, ‘crumble‐top,’ trifle, a subject Haris had written a lengthy comedic essay about. Haris was someone who was always full of life, this seems a generic term in this context but those of you who knew him, know this is not the case. In the passing of Haris, we have a lost a friend, an inspiration, a talented student who would have made a real difference in this world. Despite the brevity of his great life, Haris achieved a lot and influenced many. I for one am thankful to have known my greatest friend, even if our friendship lasted just 4 years. Haris’s spirit will live on as long as we keep living for the moment, enjoying its peculiarities and being spontaneous. Haris was a fan of the Lord of the Rings, he and I learnt some elvish on one of our adventures together. Namárië Haris, no in elenath hîlar nan hâd gîn, Farewell Haris, may the stars shine on your path.

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